Buddhism images series of south Sri Lanka
Theravada
Theravada Buddhism, along with Mahayana Buddhism, are the two principal branches of Buddhist belief. It is most widespread in Sri Lanka, Myanmar (formerly known as Burma), Laos, Cambodia, and Thailand. Like Mahayana Buddhism, Theravada (Pali for "School of the Elders") claims to perpetuate the true teachings and practices of the Buddha.
The Theravada school traces its descent from the original sangha, or monastic community, that first followed the Buddha. Its canon of scripture consists of the Tipitaka (Three Baskets), the first great compendium of Buddhist writings, composed in the Pali language. Theravada tends toward doctrinal conservatism, exemplified in a cautious interpretation of its canon. Because of this, it has been given the pejorative name Hinayana (Sanskrit for "Lesser Vehicle") by its rivals, who call their own tradition Mahayana ("Greater Vehicle"). The goal of the Theravadin, or devotee of Theravada, is to become an arhat, a sage who has achieved nirvana (enlightenment) and will never be reborn. Mahayana traditionally prefers the figure of the bodhisattva - who, out of compassion, helps others toward salvation - to the arhat, who is concerned chiefly with his own salvation.
Dondra, Devinuwara Devalaya Temple.  
Dondra, Devinuwara Devalaya Temple.  
Mulkirigala, the Mulkirigala Rock Temple.
Mulkirigala, the Mulkirigala Rock Temple.
Mulkirigala, the Mulkirigala Rock Temple.
The shape of the pistil of a lotus flower is the origin of the shape of the Buddhist stupa in Sri Lanka.
Unawatuna, Japanese Peace Pagoda Rumassala. 
Unawatuna, Japanese Peace Pagoda Rumassala. 
Tangalle, a young buddhist follower sitting on the shore of Paradise beach.

Tangalle, the image of the Buddha accompanying passengers on a bus in southern
Sri Lanka.

 
Rumassala, a statue of Buddha lying down.
Wewurukannala, inside the Temple.
Wewurukannala, approaching the temple you can see the big Buddha statue almost 50 meters high.
Wewurukannala, statues at the entrance of the Temple.
Wewurukannala, statues inside the Temple.
Wewurukannala, statues of Buddha inside the Temple.

Wewurukannala, depiction of Buddhist Hell in the Wewurukannala Temple.
 
View on Heaven and Hell of Somdet Phra Nyanasamvara, Supreme Patriarch of Thai Buddhism.
"As we are so familiar, in religious sphere, the concept of heaven and hell is a very prominent belief. In many cases, it becomes the goal of religious practice itself. On this very subject, His Holiness critically analyses that the very concept and belief of heaven and hell in Buddhism is a cultural influence of indigenous culture and belief. He states: (I quote) ‘the subject of cosmology appeared in Buddhism is clearly can be seen that it is not ‘Buddhist teaching’ at all but an ancient geography. The concept and belief about it was included in Buddhist Canon merely because of strong influence of popular belief of the time. Later Commentaries further explain about heaven and hell in a greater detail distant itself from the original teaching of the Buddha. If Buddhism teaches such belief on heaven and hell it would not be Buddhism at all but an ancient geography. Buddha wouldn’t be the Buddha who delivered the Noble Truth and ‘timeless’ message for mankind.’ (p. 1) (end of the quote) He then shows in his teaching that the concept of heaven and hell in Buddhism are in fact symbolic, representing the quality of mind and spirituality instead. One can be in heaven and hell in this very earth and life. No need to wait until one dies..."

 
Wewurukannala, depiction of Buddhist Hell in the Wewurukannala Temple.
Over sin, under the punishment.
Wewurukannala, the Buddha's face peeps through the leaves of a tree.
Wewurukannala, two women seek shelter in the shadow coming out of the Temple.
Buddhism images series of south Sri Lanka
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Buddhism images series of south Sri Lanka

A series of descriptive images of Theravada Buddhist worship in the temples of southern Sri Lanka.
9
237
0
Published:

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