Textualize

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  • Textualize
     
    Textualize is a typography system that bridges speech to the written word. There is a clear deficiency in the way we communicate on digital platforms. 70% of communication relies on factors other than content (e.g. body language, tone, etc.) and the nuances in speech are on their way to becoming obsolete. This system is an attempt to bring some personability into the content of our communication.
     
    Textualize splits speech into four parts: inflections, volume, acceleration, and pausing. Each of these elements are represented by minimally disruptive visual marks superimposed on the text. Once the reader is able to comprehend the system they will be able to read it the way it was meant to be said, eliminating the large majority of common miscommunication.
     
    Serving as a catalyst for learning, an archive of celebrities and politicians that are recognized for their unique voices are used to demonstrate how the system works. Examples include: Tyler, the Creator, Jessica Simpson, Barack Obama, Mila Kunis, Adolf Hitler, and more.
     
     
     
     
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    Typography
     
    The Textualize logotype is a conglomeration of [arguably] the most readable and accessible typefaces of print and web platforms: Times (print) & Helvetica (web). The two parts come together to make a slightly unconventional mark with forced serifs emphasizing the concept of individualism and expression.
     
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    Website
     
    The website allows users to interact with the Textualize system. It uses familiar faces—excerpts from politicians and celebrities who have been recognized by their distinction in their speech. Audio samples are included throughout.
     




  • Posters
     
    The posters each show one of the celebrities or politicians featured in the archive. The marks from their excerpt are superimposed onto their portrait sans content. The idea is that the way someone speaks can define their character just as much—if not more than the content of what they are saying. The larger mark in the middle is decided based on the frequency of use in the excerpt. This "dominant" mark is a good indicator of personality.