MiniPlayer for Chromecast
PHONE & TABLET
 
In 2013 we released the Chromecast UI, which
enabled Chromecast users to browse for movies
and TV shows on their phones and tablets and
cast to a television. 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
MiniPlayer Redesign
The goal of this redesign was to create an experience that enables the user full control of the currently playing title while simultaneously browsing the Netflix catalogue. The MiniPlayer toggles between two modes, collapsed and expanded.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 
Collapsed
The purpose of the MiniPlayer is to allow control
over the video stream while allowing members to
still browses the Netflix catalog.  A minimal set of
controls are displayed in order to maintain a small
on-screen footprint.  
 
 
 
 
 
 
Expanded
Once a user needs to have finer control over the 
video stream, they are able to go into a full screen
mode that provides affordances for scrubbing, subtitles,
volume, rating, and a number of other features.
 
 
 
Exploring Stop
We experimented heavily with finding the right balance between exposed functionality versus minimal footprint. An important part of that discussion was evaluating the value of stop as it pertains to the digital space. Stop is largely a relic of physical media, and it does not seem like an appropriate metaphor for a stateful, cross-platform media service that allows for seamless transition between watching and not watching. However, in the context of a multi-device experience, stop may have some value, as a means for terminating the Chromecast connection. This lead us to removing it from the collapsed view, but keeping it in the expanded view.
 
 
 
Exploring Volume
In early concepts, we tried to incorporate volume as a top level action in the expanded miniplayer. However, we found that the stacked appearance introduced a level of confusion when the user wanted to manipulate either volume or playback. This unwanted cognitive load was reduced by moving volume to a secondary action. This decision was reinforced by the platforms that allow volume control via hardware buttons and the fact that most TVs/receivers still serve as the master volume for playback.
 
 
Exploring Visual Design
Visual design went through various explorations, including this colorful variant which used a title's artwork color as an added environmental effect to the MiniPlayer's background.