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    Cornell University Spring 2011 Professors Lisa Iwamoto & Branden Hookway Site: San Francisco, California; Piers 27 + 29 Program: Large scale p… Read More
    Cornell University Spring 2011 Professors Lisa Iwamoto & Branden Hookway Site: San Francisco, California; Piers 27 + 29 Program: Large scale pavillion capable of maintaining 60,000+ visitors daily that provides space for ticketing, main seating, VIP seating, welcome centers, stages, exhibitions, concessions, merchandising, hospitality and back of house operation space. Objective: The approach to this project was to insert a new structural system within and around the existing buildings that would not only provide for heavy traffic flow through various areas of the piers, but also privilege and react to special moments of use, spectacle and phenomenological opportunities. The structure itself has a defined logic that allows it to morph in depth, width, and angle; affecting views, exposure, and inhabitants based on both structural loads and programmatic weight. The system moves primarily horizontally around the existing pier buildings, occasionally folding down to define new spatial, and functional boundaries. The pavilion was designed as an “open-air” space to promote the use of popup-architecture venues as a way for spectators and vendors to flow and interact effortlessly. Read Less
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Cornell University 
Spring 2011
Professors Lisa Iwamoto & Branden Hookway

Site: San Francisco, California; Piers 27 + 29

Program: Large scale pavillion capable of maintaining 60,000+ visitors daily that provides space for ticketing, main seating, VIP seating, welcome centers, stages, exhibitions, concessions, merchandising, hospitality and back of house operation space.

Objective: The approach to this project was to insert a new structural system within and around the existing buildings that would not only provide for heavy traffic flow through various areas of the piers, but also privilege and react to special moments of use, spectacle and phenomenological opportunities. The structure itself has a defined logic that allows it to morph in depth, width, and angle; affecting views, exposure, and inhabitants based on both structural loads and programmatic weight. The system moves primarily horizontally around the existing pier buildings, occasionally folding down to define new spatial, and functional boundaries. The pavillion was designed as an “open-air” space to promote the use of popup-architecture venues as a way for spectators and vendors to flow and interact effortlessly.