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    Cornell Univeristy Summer 2010 Professor Werner Goehner Istanbul, Turkey - Traveling Studio Located on the eastern shore of the Golden Horn,… Read More
    Cornell Univeristy Summer 2010 Professor Werner Goehner Istanbul, Turkey - Traveling Studio Located on the eastern shore of the Golden Horn, the shipyard which has an industrial heritage, is one of the world’s oldest surviving shipyards built in 1455. In 2010 Istanbul was named the European Capital of Culture and discussions began on how to use the area to promote Istanbul's diverse cultural identity. For this studio, I proposed that the shipyard be opened to the public and converted into waterfront green space, accessible from both land and sea. While careful not to undermine the historical importance of the site, the shipyard acts as a barrier effectively cutting off connectivity along the shoreline and a much needed public promenade. Living in Turkey for the summer months, I was able to experience how people behaved in open spaces and how space was used along the coast line in a number of cities. What I observed was that the Turkish people have a fond appreciation and connection to the water. It was not uncommon for me to site in a park all day and see that families spent all day in parks, playing, fishing, swimming, reading, and eating. By opening the shipyard to the public as a park, it would invite residence of the surrounding areas to investigate and use the space recreationally while also allowing the citizens of Istanbul to gain an appreciation for the historical significance of the site. Dedicating and building facilities to educate and house artifacts of historical importance would also draw people to the park maintaining and teaching guests of the site's cultural heritage. Read Less
    Published:
Cornell Univeristy 
Summer 2010
Professor Werner Goehner 
 
Istanbul, Turkey - Traveling Studio 
 
Located on the eastern shore of the Golden Horn, the shipyard which has an industrial heritage, is one of the world’s oldest surviving shipyards built in 1455. In 2010 Istanbul was named the European Capital of Culture and discussions began on how to use the area to promote Istanbul's diverse cultural identity. 
 
For this studio, I proposed that the shipyard be opened to the public and convered into waterfront green space, accessable from both land and sea. While careful not to undermine the historical importance of the site, the shipyard acts as a barrier effectively cutting off conectivity along the shoreline and a much needed public promenade. Living in Turkey for the summer months, I was able to experience how people behaved in open spaces and how space was used along the coast line in a nuber of cities. What I observed was that the Turkish people have a fond appreciation and connection to the water. It was not uncommon for me to site in a park all day and see that families spent all day in parks, playing, fishing, swimming, reading, and eating.
 
By opening the shipyard to the public as a park, it would invite residence of the surrounding areas to investigate and use the space recreationally while also allowing the citizens of Istanbul to gain an appreciation for the historical significance of the site. Dedicating and building facilites to educate and house artifacts of historical importance would also draw people to the park maintaining and teaching guests of the site's cultural heritage.