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    30 Americans was an exhibition of the work of contemporary African American artists from the Rubell Family Collection at the Corcoran Gallery of … Read More
    30 Americans was an exhibition of the work of contemporary African American artists from the Rubell Family Collection at the Corcoran Gallery of Art. The campaign worked to engage all of the diverse audiences in Washington DC though an interactive branding campaign. Read Less
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Selection, AIGA 50 DC Biennial Design Competition
30 Americans was an exhibition of the work of contemporary African American artists from the Rubell Family Collection at the Corcoran Gallery of Art. 
The wordmark is a high-contrast black band. In some contexts, it operates as a frame, in others, as a highlight or a line of connection, underscoring the curator's focus on the connection and community amongst the artists featured. The number 30 is set in a thin weight, responding to the collector's statement that 30 was an arbitrary number--there were surely additional artists that could have been added. Americans is set in black, highlighting that the show was focused on Americans, rather than the pigeon-holed concept of "African Americans" or "Black Americans."
The painted band spanned the outside wall of the galleries included in the exhibition.
The artist listing could be used to highlight specific artists by their work while emphasing the broadness of the show.
The exhibition was also supported by a community outreach campaign, "Say It Loud." Inspired by the James Brown song and a Glenn Ligon essay that referenced it, and reflecting the exhibiton's assertation that one deserves to define their own identity, the campaign invited visitors to share themselves loudly and proudly. 
Visitors were invited to participate at events like DC Pride.
Visitors could also participate in the gallery, using both an iPad app for video comments, or a written comment slip, archived on the 30 Americans microsite.