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Sir Bradley Marc Wiggins, CBE (born 28 April 1980), nicknamed "Wiggo", is an English professional road and track racing cyclist who rides for the… Read More
Sir Bradley Marc Wiggins, CBE (born 28 April 1980), nicknamed "Wiggo", is an English professional road and track racing cyclist who rides for the UCI ProTeam Team Sky.[5] Wiggins began his career on the track, but has made the transition to road cycling and is one of the few cyclists to gain significant elite level success in both forms of professional cycling. Wiggins was born in Ghent, Belgium, before moving to London, where he began track cycling. He has won six gold medals at the track world championships, his first in 2003 and his most recent in 2008; three in the individual pursuit, two in the team pursuit and one in the Madison. He won a gold in the individual pursuit at the 2004 Olympic Games and two golds in the individual and team pursuit at the 2008 Olympic Games. After the 2008 Olympics, Wiggins took a break from the track to focus on the road. Initially viewed as a time trial specialist and as a rouleur, he showed his ability in stage races when he came fourth in the 2009 Tour de France; he was later promoted to third after Lance Armstrong's results were annulled in 2012. In 2011 he claimed his first victory in a major stage race in the Critérium du Dauphiné, and he also finished third in the Vuelta a España. In 2012, Wiggins won the Paris–Nice, the Tour de Romandie, the Critérium du Dauphiné, and became the first British cyclist to win the Tour de France and the time trial at the Olympic Games. Following his success in 2012, Wiggins was the subject of several honours and awards; the Vélo d'Or award for best rider of the year, the BBC Sports Personality of the Year Award and awarded a knighthood as part of the 2013 New Year Honours. Wiggins stated that he felt "a little bit inferior" to others receiving knighthoods saying "I’ve won a bike race, you know, and I feel a little bit inferior to everyone", saying "I was just talking to some of the other people getting stuff, and asking them what they’ve been honoured for, and they’re historic things, ground-breaking sciences or whatever".[6] Read Less
Published:
Bradley Wiggins on assignement for Sport Week Magazine
ph. editor Naima Mancini