Baskin Robbins Identity & Marketing Redesign
 
 
INTRO
Baskin Robbins is the world's largest chain of ice cream specialty shops. It was founded by two ice cream enthuiasts Burt Baskin and Irv Robbin in 1945. By the end of 2009, the company consisted of 6,207 franchised locations worldwide, in 33  countries and 46 states.
 
 
 
 
CURRENT LOGO
 
Baskin Robbins is proudly known as a traditional ice-cream shop. It is a fun and welcoming environment where there is something for everyone. It is a playful, approachable and classic brand whose audience ranges from everyone from children to adults.
 
Their current logo attempts to illustrate this through the use of zigzagged typography and a dull pink and dark blue palette. While the company strives to be fun, dynamic and relevant, their identity lacks.
 
INSPIRTATION
 
To create their new logo I decided to draw on inspiration from their rich history. One of the most unique and amazing things about this company is that is has been successful in a steadily diluting business for over 50 years
 
Even with the rise of higher-end, premium ice cream, such as Coldstones, Baskin Robbins’ fun and family oriented brand continues to strive
 
 
LOGO REDESIGN
 
For their new logo I decided to create something entirely hand lettered and focused on a retro feeling reflective of their origins in the 1950’s
 
 
 
FINAL LOGO
 
The result is a clean, unique logotype, which communicates fun without having to be a haphazard mash of angles such as their current logo.
 
 
REMOVAL OF THE NUMBER 31

The original logo of course features the number 31. This is reflective of how when the company first opened they offered 31 flavours, in the idea that a customer would have enough choices to choose a new flavour every day of the month.
 
While I debated on the removal of the 31, I ultimately decided that it’s meaning may not be inherently known to everyone in that is no longer a relevant number. By this I mean that the company continues to produce new flavours every year. Today their flavour library consists of over 1,000 different varieties. They also over products other then ice cream such as cakes, pie, frozen yogurt and smoothies.
 
My thought process here then is that the inclusion number 31 does not add anything to the brand and it in fact maybe even underdress what the company is able to offer today
 
 
 
 

COLOUR PALETTE & TYPOGRAPHY

I punched up their de-saturated palette with the choice a hotter pink paired with more subtle highlights of blue. For the typography I chose the font Avenir for its rounded and friendly design.
 
 
APPLICATIONS

I took this retro feeling of the logo and applied it to the rest of the branding. I used a stacking of different, complimentary fonts, textures and symbols to create this pattern. I then applied it on the cup’s, cone wrappers and other packaged materials.
 
 
 
 
BUSINESS CARDS
 
The business cards follow a similar theme. They are bright, eye catching and quite unlike the average company card.
 
 
 
T-SHIRTS & PINS
 
I also created a series of t-shirts and pins to give an idea of how the brand’s new visual indentity could effectively displayed. Here I introduce another pattern, this one of the brand’s iconic pink spoon.
WEB DESIGN
 
I also looked at ways to update their website so that it would better fit in with the rest of the design. Their current website is a tad boring, dated and even a little cheesy. It features dull blue text with a white outer glow effect, slightly washed out, unsaturated colours and a seemingly cushioned background.
 
SOLUTION
 
I went with the idea of a dynamic full screen website with slide down menues and a bigger focus on photography, as that is what truly sells the product
 
 
PUBLICATIONS & PHOTOGRAPHY
 
The following are examples of their current typical layouts. They communicate fun, but in a way that is very overstated, dated and easy to glance over because of its crowded design.
 
 
PHOTOGRAPHY
 
Their photography also lacks visual appeal or anything that would make it stand out or even be relatable to the viewer. They are often over touched and as a result lack personality.
 
 
 
 
NEW DIRECTION
 
To bring life back into their photography, I chose to focus on bright, lively photos and also the idea of real human experience.
 
When I first showed one of my classmates my logo design, he said he liked it because it reminded him of getting ice-cream after his house league games as a kid. I thought this was the perfect feeling to apply to the brand.
 
I wanted to form a visual feeling based on these kind of experiences; ice cream on a hot summer day, or after a baseball game on a cool evening. These familar and cherished memories that everyone from kids to adults seem to have.
 
Instead of over touched photographs simply of the products, I chose to focus on the idea of actually human experience. 
 
 
 
 
PUBLICATION DESIGN
 
For times where the main focus needs to be on the products, I created a publication layout could be used to effectively show off their treats. The resulting design is very clean, bright and inviting
 
I used colourful photography and paired with the occasional highlights of colours in the tittle. I also treated the larger typography in a similar manner as the rest of the brand. There is mix of page styles to create visual interest between each page. Overall, it dynamic and fun without being over done like their current layouts.
 
 
ANIMATION
 
Lastly I created a quick animation. It illustrates their values in a modern way, but still with that old fashioned feeling of fun
 
 
 
 
FINAL THOUGHTS
 
Overall, I believe I have created a very eye-catching and fun visual identity true to what their brand is meant to communicate.
 
Within the applications I have found a way to update the company without loosing sight of its original values. 
Baskin Robbins Identity & Marketing Redesign
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Baskin Robbins Identity & Marketing Redesign

The following is an redesign of Baskin Robbin's current visual identity and marketing angle. The redesign draws off of Baskin Robbins' rich histo Read More
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