Fire
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'Fire'
As part of a University of Michigan initiative to explore arts-driven inquiry, Arts on Earth sponsored multidisciplinary faculty teams to develop work that explores environmental issues. Our team was Karl Daubmann (Associate Professor of Architecture), Werner Dahm (Laboratory for Turbulence & Combustion, Department of Aerospace Engineering and currently the Chief Scientist for the US Airforce at the Pentagon) and myself John Marshall (Assistant Professor in the School of Art & Design). We were given the element of fire to work with.
We began by asking how to design fire, rethinking or repositioning its characteristics and attempting to use its broad range without ever having to strike a match. The resulting installation tries to use the characteristics of fire to extend the way we might consider technology and experience. 'Fire', a cluster of 22 digitally-fabricated, augmented objects that together form a complex system capable of responding to people, digital information, and the physical environment in which they are situated. The piece consists of 22 laser cut aluminum 'cones', 24 Arduinos, 660 super bright LEDs, 17 passive infrared sensors and a whole load of wiring held together by a CNC routed frame. The structure is located in the approach to the University of Michigan's Duderstadt Center.
The timber frame to support the piece and house the electronics. It is on temporary short columns so we can work on it in the studio.
The frame was CNC routed to accomodate the Aluminum 'cones'.
Wiring the 660 super bright LEDs. There are 30 in each 'cone', wired in 10 groups each with a resistor. The wiring is mounted on a CNC cut Masonite board.
The Aluminum 'cones' were unrolled in Rhino and laser cut from 10' x 5' sheets. 
Testing the first 'cone'.
A detail of the illuminated Aluminum.
Changing the variables on the Arduino code for each 'cone' as it is installed.
The electronics are mounted on the frame.
Connecting the passive infrared sensors to the Arduino boards.
The assembled 'cones' ready to be mounted.
Testing as everything comes together.
The 2 halves of the frame are separated for transportation to the site.
Putting everything back in place and testing on site.
Lifting the structure into place.
Installing the support columns.
The finished project. This photograph by Earl Carlson http://www.theearlcarlson.com/duderstadt/fire.html
Fire
62
2214
6
Published:

Fire

The units that make up 'Fire' are produced using associative geometrical modeling and parametric design and are lasercut from aluminum. Each unit Read More
62
2214
6
Published:

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