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    June 21 through 24, the inaugural Mykonos Biennale took place at the heart of the Greek Cyclades islands. Lydia Venieri, a New York based Greek a… Read More
    June 21 through 24, the inaugural Mykonos Biennale took place at the heart of the Greek Cyclades islands. Lydia Venieri, a New York based Greek artist, curated the core exhibition under the banner 'Crisis and Paganism', showing work by Lucas Samaras, Takis, Lydia Venieri, ORLAN, Nobuhiro Ishihara, Karren Finley, Chiara Clemente, Alfredo Romano, Robert Flynt, Gary Indiana, Gregory de la Haba and more. Gallerists, young artists, locals and, of course, tourists convened for a series of happenings where poetry and dance, along with suitably Dionysian amounts of food and wine, combined in a part-sacred, part-pagan voyage around the party-worn alleys of Mykonos and the deserted ruins of nearby Delos. Venieri's stated intention was to commit "an art crime" in Greece, a country that has, in Europe at least, lately been synonymous with social suffering. Her ideas seemed to suggest that the currently embattled Greeks know how to sustain their ancient values and confront their fears through gatherings and dancing. Rich food was everywhere, venues were strewn with defiantly colorful blooms, and an afternoon feast in a magnificent vineyard seemed to hint that nature and togetherness, as ever, will provide the solutions to Greece's transitory woes. Discovering new, hidden aspects of Mykonos - most famous for its wild clubbing and gay-friendly atmosphere - through the eyes of such a charismatic persona, was an unforgettable experience for all. The islands obliged with their characteristic combination of sun, wind and 3,000 years of history. Venieri brought modern art to a table where, thankfully, everyone was encouraged to grab a plate. We look forward to the next course. Read Less
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