Les poules couvent souvent au couvent.
Les poules couvent souvent au couvent. 
The hens often brood at the convent.
 
This is the first sentence that the character Amélie utters in Le fabuleux destin d'Amélie Poulain, where her mother teaches her how to pronounce the two instances of "couvent." The first, \kuv\, is a conjugated form of "couver," which means to sit over eggs. The second, \kuvɑ̃\, means convent.
 
I wonder if there was a metaphorical context to this tongue-twister—were they talking about the existential questions in a brooding nun's mind? I've been trying to find what this sentence means metaphorically; so far all I've found on google aside from literal translations is, "The chickens cluck more often than the rooster crows," which I'm taking to mean something about gossipy women?
Faux amis, virelangue, homographes, homophones.
Et tout qui me rend confuse sur le français. Une série de dessins sur les mots en anglais et français qui semblent similaire.
 
Faux amis (false friends) are pairs of words in different languages that look the same, but don't have the same meaning. However, not all faux amis are false cognates, sometimes they are paronyms with shared etymology and similar spelling. Homographs and homophones, loosely defined, are types of homonyms. Mind boggled? Me too. This is just me trying to make sense of the French.
Les poules couvent souvent au couvent.
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Les poules couvent souvent au couvent.

Une série de dessins sur les mots en anglais et français qui semblent similaire. // Faux amis (false friends) are pairs of words in different lan Read More
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