Martina Pugliese's profile
Drawing Climate Change - in data
A series of hand-drawn vizzes on the topic of climate change

I'm illustrating phenomena that tell us our planet needs a break, plus data that narrate our collective attitudes towards the anthropogenic causes of climate change. We need to talk about this more, we need to take stronger and quicker action. Data is from various sources, always reported.
How many stories has The New York Times written in time about climate change? These are counts I've extracted from its website (via its search feature) for articles containing "climate change" or "global warming" - it is also interesting to note how much the two phrases have been used in time. For reference, the inset reports the counts for all stories, so you can contextualise the numbers. 2009 was the year of the UN Copenhagen Conference on Climate Change. You can read more here.
USA: political affiliation, measured from a Gallup poll (2018) and percentage of people who believes that global warming is human-caused, from the Yale climate opinion maps (2019). Unsurprisingly, Republican states are less convinced, Democrat ones dominate the higher values.
Glaciers are melting - but how much have we lost? This shows the cumulative mass change in reference glaciers since the 1970s, data from the World Glacier Monitoring Service. Polar bears (and many others) are losing their habitat. 
Coral loss in the last 30 years (-50%), globally, largely due to bleaching from increased ocean temperatures. Data from the show Chasing Coral.
The Arctic is warming twice as fast as the rest of Earth. Read about it in Science.
This is what's happening to our global fauna, data from a PNAS paper - a study on vertebrates in particular. Human-caused change in climate is altering the environment where many species live, making them disappear at a rate way higher than the one we've seen in the last 2 million years. The paper is a very good read.
We do eat too much meat, and we are doing more and more so the richer we become. Livestock has a large impact on climate change, in terms of emissions created, deforestation, decrease in biodiversity. Data is from Our World in Data, which reads from FAO's reports.   
What is the biomass of humans with respect to other species in the biosphere? Data from this PNAS paper. We humans have a biomass of 0.06 gigatonnes of carbon, and livestock has a sensibly higher one, while wild mammals are one order of magnitude below us. So we are significant, but it is interesting to compare to plants, bacteria and other kingdoms too.
Drawing Climate Change - in data
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Drawing Climate Change - in data

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Published: