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    Philip Johnson's Glass House is a stunning glass walled structure of meticulous proportions based on the golden section.
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Philip Johnson's Glass House

Soon after completion in 1949, the house was featured in LIFE magazine–the world of architecture was on notice, Philip Johnson had arrived.



The Glass House was an opportunity for Philip Johnson to establish himself as a professional architect. The result was a stunning glass-walled structure of meticulous proportions and details. The shocking transparency of the house is emphasized by the absence of interior walls and the ability to look within and out. Only a brick cylinder, containing a bath and fireplace, rises from the floor and pierces the ceiling. Soon after completion in 1949 the house was featured in LIFE magazine–the world of architecture was on notice, Philip Johnson had arrived.

From the book "Geometry of Design," by Kimberly Elam, Princeton Architectural Press

Glass House Front Elevation and Golden Section
Each of the three main divisions of the house is in golden section Proportions. The narrow horizontal windows correspond to the square in the golden section rectangle, #1. The width of the window to the left and right of the door is a golden section rectangle.






Glass House Side Elevation and Golden Section Proportions
Two overlapping golden section rectangles define the proportion of the width of the house. The overlapping area of these two golden section rectangles defines the doorway.




Glass House Plan View and Golden Section Proportions
The plan view of the Glass House is very close to golden section proportion. Doors are symmetrical at the center of each exterior wall. The bathroom and fireplace are enclosed in a brick cylinder. The diameter of the cylinder is 1/3 the depth and 1/5 the length of the golden section rectangle.