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The 100 Worlds Project began with a singular idea – to create for the sake of creating. To play and have fun as a child would. As a Creative Dire… Read More
The 100 Worlds Project began with a singular idea – to create for the sake of creating. To play and have fun as a child would. As a Creative Director of a design firm, I use my creativity to benefit my clients. In the shifting tides of business climates and new paradigms, I felt the need to channel my creative energy into something that was pure. To challenge myself to be resourceful, to see everyday objects in a different way, and uncover new potential in objects and talents that were often overlooked. I turned to a favorite childhood toy – the globe. A globe represents community, collaboration, communication, materials, people… These metaphors gave me inspiration, which lead to countless sketches and ideas. Objects I collected for years began to find their places. People I knew began to provide vital skills and resources that helped complete each piece. I set a goal to create 100 unique globes. What I uncovered was far more than the sculptures I ended up creating: A renewed sense of vigor about my world, my community, and my purpose. Read Less
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100 WORLDS PROJECT

An exhibition of globe-inspired sculptures made by Ron Miriello, in collaboration with a community of craftsmen, makers, photographers and amici.
The 100 Worlds Project began with a simple idea – to create without commerce.  I felt the need to a channel some creative energy toward a project without a clear objective and without a clear end point. To be resourceful with my time, with the objects around me and with the potency of the ample creative community that surrounded me.

A favorite childhood toy held the theme.  A globe -  representing community, collaboration, communications... The metaphors are many and led to countless sketches. Seemingly useless objects I collected for years, became essential. People I knew provided vital skills and resources to complete the pieces. A  goal was set to create 100 unique globes and to involve as many "communities" as possible in the process- welders, photographers, educators, clients, friends. Each a creative contributor. An artist in their own unique way.
Globe #40 photographed by Philipp Rittermann  Globe #44 photographed by Carl Vanderschuit
Sample spreads from the exhibition catalog.