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  • Interaction Designer
    Lincoln Financial Group — Philadelphia, PA, USA
  • UI/UX Designer
    Verizon Wireless — NJ, USA
  • Design/Office Assistant
    Philadelphia University — Philadelphia, PA, USA
  • Resident Manager/Assistant
    Philadelphia University — Philadelphia, PA, USA
  • Technology Help Desk Associate
    Philadelphia University — Philadelphia, PA, USA
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During my studies at Philadelphia University my passion for graphic design became fine tuned and evolved into an appreciation of typography and a new interest in typeface design. In my Advance Typography class I read a quote from Ellen Lupton ,"Typography is what language looks like." This idea of something so ove… Read More
During my studies at Philadelphia University my passion for graphic design became fine tuned and evolved into an appreciation of typography and a new interest in typeface design. In my Advance Typography class I read a quote from Ellen Lupton ,"Typography is what language looks like." This idea of something so overlooked by people meant something to me. When discovering new typefaces and the history behind them I developed my own ideas of what typefaces and fonts are, they are people.

A lot of typefaces like Helvetica and Arial are similar with something insignificantly different about them, but when you get close and personal you see their quarks and you realize that Helvetica is that businessman who secretly loves getting his hands dirty and making a mark on the world; wheras Arial is the average joe, who is adaptable and likes to get to know everyone.

When I design a typeface I think about who that typeface is and how are they going to interact with other typefaces. Gridlock is based around the working-class driving back and forth in traffic, stuck with each other. Damian is that nostalgic person who loves old buildings, small towns, and the back alley resturant he heard from a good friend. He wants to bring some of that old gold and shine it up for the world to see. This personification allows each typeface to literaty speak for itself. Read Less
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