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Timothy Hadrian Marshall graduated in Graphic Design from Saint Martins School of Art in 1984. On graduating he became Artist in Residence at the then Prince of Wales Hospital, London, for four years; where he worked on a project to visually improve patients’ waiting areas in the North Middlesex Hospital. But his… Read More
Timothy Hadrian Marshall graduated in Graphic Design from Saint Martins School of Art in 1984. On graduating he became Artist in Residence at the then Prince of Wales Hospital, London, for four years; where he worked on a project to visually improve patients’ waiting areas in the North Middlesex Hospital. But his first love, and abiding passion, is photography and this is where Tim ultimately focused his creative energy.  
He began working as a photojournalist – and was published in the Guardian and Observer, as well as many other national newspapers. His photographs have been exhibited at PowerHouse UK in an exhibition curated by The Department of Trade and Industry in Whitehall 1998. In 2003 he worked for the V&A, photographing visitors to the Notting Hill Carnival in a project dedicated to recording and celebrating ‘black style’. He has worked on projects for a number of commercial clients, which have included Fly, Laurence King, Coco de Mer, Jannuzzi Smith, Magic Show for Hayward Gallery publications, and Capitol Economics. Whilst doing so he has continued to produce new bodies of personal photo-diary/documentary work. Many themes of his work have been published online, including a series of photographs uploaded to The London Column, celebrating the changing nature of the city. But Rome is the first to be published as a book, and what a beautiful combination of grand history and contemporary vigour it is.
Currently he works at Central Saint Martins School of Art, working in the studio and teaching photography, where he is a constant inspiration to the students he m Read Less
Always working on new projects and keeping up with changes in media and image technology.
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