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This project deals with the inability by individuals to assimilate things that make no reference to anything specific through sculptures, photographs and installations; It discusses the shapeless, based on a number of organic shapes that cause concern whilst at the same time are fascinating. These pieces of work m… Read More
This project deals with the inability by individuals to assimilate things that make no reference to anything specific through sculptures, photographs and installations; It discusses the shapeless, based on a number of organic shapes that cause concern whilst at the same time are fascinating. These pieces of work made in nylon and silicone coated hollow fibre, among other materials, put forward indetermination of the object and cause confusion in the public.

We can place abjection in many scopes and/or comprehensions that it provokes socially.

With the baseline of Julia Kristeva’s association she discusses about Human Animality as one of the emotive foundations of abjection, the feeling of repugnance and indignation linked to the presence of animal qualities in humans, we are able to say that when a body, an object or a predetermined shape no longer hold their natural form, this automatically influences us and challenges our logic, leading to a feeling of uncertainty, rejection and even foreboding. We do not know how to interpret them, nor what form of knowledge we need to resort to in order to define that new object.

In this association abjection is directly linked to the formal appearance of objects. Nevertheless, even if this is considered unpleasant or repulsive, it is no less fascinating and continues to captivate us.

One of the main emotions of abjection is the feeling of repugnance. This emotion represents the separation of frontiers between man and the world, between subject and object, between interior and exterior; everything that has to be separated out and even eliminated. Disgust is a powerful emotion for most human beings, and it could be said that it somehow shapes our intimacy and is a part of our routine. We seek privacy to urinate and defecate, we sniff our own armpits when nobody else is there to see us, and we even check that there is nothing trapped among our nose hairs in front of the mirror. Our social relations are partly based on what we find repugnant and the different ways we go about avoiding it.

This project shows us one of the classic expressions of abjection, the shapelessness of objects. Formally the work provokes particularly visceral emotions, since it involves strong physical reactions to stimuli that have clearly bodily characteristics, such as veins and conjuncts of organic forms that comprise the work, such as the colour, the appearance of nylon, similar to a thin layer of skin, through which we are able to see textures and characteristics that refer to something organic outside of its context, its space, i.e. something that makes it dirty and inevitably to represent something else.

Rejection of this otherness is measured by the fact that they remind us of what we are, of our mortality and animal vulnerability. Their appearance and strong physicality make spectators reflect and try to reach a conclusion to decide what they are actually seeing, what it refers to and why it is there. A dialogue is created between subject and object, a controversy in which individuals seek self-confirmation about something they are unable assimilate.

Repugnance is another emotion that involves the limits of the body, the perishable aspects of it. When something reminds us what we are or simply where we come from, we avoid it; it disgusts us to recognise that animal weakness, the perishable side of life and our bodies.

When we come into contact with this kind of highly cognitive concepts surprise is a factor that dominates our feeling of repugnance towards abjections. But abjection, and shapelessness, as we have already seen, are more than just a simple idea of surprise or distancing from social norms.

The objective of this project is to give the public an insight into the underworld of abjection, in a gradual reflexive manner, to cause shock that cannot easily be eluded.

[…] the massive abrupt emergence of a strangeness that, although somewhat familiar in an opaque forgotten life, now harasses me as radically separate, repugnant. Not I. Not that. But neither is it nothing. A “something” I do not recognise as anything. A weight of senselessness that has nothing to do with insignificance and crushes me beneath it. On the threshold of inexistence and hallucination, a reality that I do recognise, annihilates me. Abject and abjection are my frontiers here.

Julia Kristeva / Sketches of my Culture. 1988. Page 8 Read Less
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