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I live and work in London at the moment.

Trained, amongst other places and times, at Edinburgh College of Art in the '80's.

I've been working for the last ten or so years on several interlinked sequences of bronze sculptures, developing techniques for casting and constructing intricate pieces that use repeated s… Read More
I live and work in London at the moment.

Trained, amongst other places and times, at Edinburgh College of Art in the '80's.

I've been working for the last ten or so years on several interlinked sequences of bronze sculptures, developing techniques for casting and constructing intricate pieces that use repeated symbolic elements, toy-like forms and simultaneous multiple scales to reflect on the nature of being human.

"men, not Man, live on the earth and inhabit the world"
Arendt, Hannah. The Human Condition.

We are all temporary, contingent agents embedded in over-arching intricate, dynamic systems and bottom-up environments (of, and not of, our making) and trying desperately to make our way through a dense forest of games, hierarchies, processes and structures.

"I live on earth at present and I don't know what I am. I know that I am not a category, I am not a thing- a noun. I seem to be a verb, an evolutionary process- an integral function of the universe..."
R.Buckminster Fuller

I draw inspiration from, amongst other things, many classic figurative sculptures (ancient Greek, Benin, German Renaissance Limewood carving, Indian temple figures...etc.) but am looking for a way of making work that describes our situation that doesn't reduce everything to the heroic narrative of an individual, and create a schism between figure and background, context and self, self and other.

The toy obsesses me: partly because it brings with it the reference to games with players, rules and limits, collaborators, allies, competitors and opponents. Partly it is its immediate, child-like delight in the readable, representational object, the magic of the enclosed world of ficticious action, and partly because a toy has an honesty about its representational limits, purposes and functionality.

A toy is not ashamed of its purpose as a representational sign, and yet has no delusions about its relationship with reality....it makes no bones about its limitations, its nature as a dependent construct, referencing something external to itself, designed to be useful in specific contexts. It never pretends to be the thing it is referencing itself, it never pretends it is the "TRUTH", the only representation possible or an indicator of it. In fact, its very function seems to mock the idea of the possibility of such a thing. ("Truth : a game the adults play"?) Its representative power (and so its usefulness ) depends on its dual character as a sign of immediate readability, and its simplification, concision and manipubality (i.e. its non real quality).

“...the intrinsic value of a small-scale model is that it compensates for the renunciation of sensible dimensions by the acquisition of intelligible dimensions.”
Claude Levi-Strauss “The Savage Mind”

Like a map, its usefulness relies on its distance from reality, but unlike a map, it has no self-important delusions of the possibility of its own objectivity, accuracy or non-contingency. The toy is an object that defies the rules of "real Life" in order to enhance the user's ability to interact with "real life".

A toy shows that all representation is a useful, but limited fiction, a construction, a thing to play with, for amusement, or to construct understanding, meaning or self-hood, or to reherse strategies for future use, in future situations. A toy teaches the player how to play and also how to be a player: how to play the serious game of being human.

Is that so very different from "art"?

Photography credits: all images posted taken by the very talented Peter Abrahams (http://www.peterabrahams.eu)

I'm currently looking for representation by galleries/exhibition opportunities, so if anyone has any suggestions, ideas, propposals, please get in touch. Read Less
Member Since: Jul 13, 2012