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I might begin introducing the work of Eric Green saying it's a happy blend of Andrew Wyeth, Edward Hopper, and Balthus. Then again, I might not. Every artist has his influences. It's what he does with them that makes the difference.

And Green - artistically self taught, citizen of Belfast, Maine, and erstwhile… Read More
I might begin introducing the work of Eric Green saying it's a happy blend of Andrew Wyeth, Edward Hopper, and Balthus. Then again, I might not. Every artist has his influences. It's what he does with them that makes the difference.

And Green - artistically self taught, citizen of Belfast, Maine, and erstwhile assembler of pulp testers - feels he has outgrown earlier aesthetic suasions. Or, he has made them like new. Green works in visual and conceptual contrasts: hot and cold, small and large, fire and water - and his main goal here it so make the opposites "amalgamate in the mind," to the point of a kind of dynamic, even blazing, neutrality. "One of my obsessions in painting, " he has said, "is to have the image take on the same kind of aesthetic sensibility [weight?] as color, composition, and surface."

Color, composition, surface, image - these constitute the great quaternity for Green, to the point that he has said that "My paintings have no specific verbal meaning, no intended symbolism outside of the visual occurrence." This extreme phenomenologicalism of the image maintains - somewhat miraculously - despite such loaded subject matter as giant hands grasping the columns of a farmhouse, graphite waters straining placidly against a seawall, lit matches the flames of which are seen making the transit from pure white to perfect black, or flaming, sea-bound isles, the result of a series involving the four elements (may we referentially exclaim, "How Wagner!?)

"I want to attain to both painterliness and illusionism," says Green on a more relaxed note. "Build and wash," he says of his oil on linen process, "build and wash. It's about removal as much as what you put down."

Which all makes for a fierce, inspired talent from whom, one feels, we'll be hearing much more. Green's conceptual reductionism is pictorially maximal; his minimalism is more a raison d'etre than an idee fixe. "I'm obsessed with just the rectangle and paint," he declares. "Anything else seems like cheating to me."

Does "anything else" include a currently fashionable video and installation art? Absolutely. "I don't think 'Painting is dead.' I think there are new things to be done with the rectangle. I think the image is the last frontier." In the end, Eric Green is really a stunning blend of his own intuitions, his own struggles, and his own triumphs. We can ask no more of a contemporary artist, at the same time wondering why so few of them - exhibiting this kind of basal aesthetic integrity - grace our galleries today. Read Less
Eric Green was given a full scholarship to the Rhode Island School of Design at the age of sixteen. After attending the school for a week, he left to ride freight trains across the country, spending four years on the road.

In addition to painting for thirty years, he worked in a frame shop, assembled pulp testers… Read More
Eric Green was given a full scholarship to the Rhode Island School of Design at the age of sixteen. After attending the school for a week, he left to ride freight trains across the country, spending four years on the road.

In addition to painting for thirty years, he worked in a frame shop, assembled pulp testers, traveled with a carnival, restored houses, painted industrial buildings from a hanging scaffold, and designed two labels for Brazilian beers. He has had several solo exhibitions in SoHo and Chelsea, received several grants, and a merit award from the National Academy of Design. In New England his paintings have been exhibited at the Ogunquit Museum, Brattleboro Museum, Robert Hull Fleming Museum, and the Portland Museum.

He writes the award-winning syndicated newspaper column, "The Penobscot Falcon" and his first novel LIVECELL was published in 2012. Read Less
BORN: 1956 Gorham, New Hampshire

SELECTED EXHIBITIONS:

2017 Group Show, "Size Doesn't Matter," Bernarducci Meisel Gallery, New York, NY

2016 Solo Exhibition, Ameringer McEnery Yohe. New York, NY

2015 Solo Exhibition, "The Early Paintings and Drawings," Dowling Walsh Gallery, Rockland, ME

2014 Solo Exhibition,… Read More
BORN: 1956 Gorham, New Hampshire

SELECTED EXHIBITIONS:

2017 Group Show, "Size Doesn't Matter," Bernarducci Meisel Gallery, New York, NY

2016 Solo Exhibition, Ameringer McEnery Yohe. New York, NY

2015 Solo Exhibition, "The Early Paintings and Drawings," Dowling Walsh Gallery, Rockland, ME

2014 Solo Exhibition, "Time Diptychs," Dowling Walsh Gallery, Rockland, ME

2001 Solo Exhibition, Gallery Henoch, New York, NY

1999 Gallery Group Show, Gallery Henoch, New York, NY

1998 Portland Museum Biennial, Portland, ME, Nov.1998 - Jan.1999

1997 Solo Exhibition, Gallery Henoch, New York, NY.

1997 Ogunquit Museum of American Art, Ogunquit, ME

1996 Fall Group Show, Gallery Henoch, New York, NY

1996 "171st Annual Exhibition," National Academy of Design, New York, NY

1995-7 “Art from the Driver’s Seat: Americans and Their Cars”
Curated by Cara 
Sutherland
Traveling to:
Museum of Our National Heritage, Lexington MA; Boise Art Museum, Boise, ID; Tarble Arts 
Center, Eastern Illinois State University, Charleston, IL; Kalamazoo 
Insititute of Arts, Kalamazoo, MI; Hudson River Museum, Yonkers, NY; 
Leigh Yawkey Woodson Art Museum, Wausau, WI; Hunter Museum of 
Art, Chattanooga, TN; Flint Institute of the Arts, Flint, MI; Mobile 
Museum of Art, Mobile, AL; The Columbus Museum, Columbus, GA.

1994 Solo Exhibition. Thos. Moser, Portland, ME

1993 "Night Light," Barn Gallery, Ogunquit, Maine

1993 "Mainescapes: 1990-1992," Ogunquit Museum of American Art, Ogunquit, ME

1993 Gallery Group Show, Galerie Bernard DesRoches, Montreal, Quebec

1992 "Eight Maine Painters," Tom Veilleux Gallery, Farmington, ME

1992 "The Great Indoors," Barn Gallery, Ogunquit, ME

1991 Solo Exhibition. Haley and Steele, Boston, MA

1990 Two Person Exhibition, Frost Gully Gallery, Portland, ME

1990 "Downtown/Downeast," Maine Coast Artists Gallery, Rockport, ME

1990 "Creative Eye, Talented Hands," Helen Day Art Center, Stowe, VT

1989 Gallery Group Show. Gallery 127, Portland, ME

1988 Gallery Group Show, Gallery 68, Belfast, ME

1986 "From Vermont," Brattleboro Museum, Brattleboro, VT

1981 "A Class Portrait," Robert Hull Fleming Museum, Burlington, VT

1980 Gallery Group Show, Galerie Bernard DesRoches, Montreal, Quebec

GRANTS and AWARDS:
1996 Merit Award, National Academy of Design
1985 Vermont Council on the Arts Fellowship
1983 Vermont Council on the Arts Fellowship
1979 Vermont Council on the Arts Fellowship

SELECTED COLLECTIONS:
John Ames III, Rockport, Maine
Arkansas Art Center, Little Rock, Arkansas
Fruit of the Loom, Inc, Chicago, Illinois
L.L. Bean, Inc. Freeport, Maine
Richard Russo, Camden, ME
Dr. Tillmann Hellwig, Stuttgart, Germany
Terry Herndon, Carlisle, Massachusetts
Orton Porter Jackson, Kennebunkport, Maine
Roger Lombard, Zurich, Switzerland
Pierce Atwood LLP, Portland, Maine
Portland Museum of Art, Portland, Maine Read Less
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