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Fine Arts
STUART WILLIAMS’ monumental environmental art installations have been critically acclaimed around the globe. Their evocative and mesmerizing presence has captivated thousands.

WORK PUBLISHED:
• Art in America / New York
• Untitled - The State of the Art / Berlin
• Abitare / Milan
• France Soir / Paris
•… Read More
STUART WILLIAMS’ monumental environmental art installations have been critically acclaimed around the globe. Their evocative and mesmerizing presence has captivated thousands.

WORK PUBLISHED:
• Art in America / New York
• Untitled - The State of the Art / Berlin
• Abitare / Milan
• France Soir / Paris
• iGNANT / Berlin
• Panorama Mese / Milan
• LIFE magazine / New York
• Stern magazine / Hamburg Read Less
Peter Selz —
Curator / Museum of Modern Art, New York —
“It (‘Luminous Earth Grid’) emanates a sense of the romantic sublime with its aura of surprise and wonder. It is a very, very beautiful thing. I think people are very lucky to have a chance to see such a fine work of art.”

Andy Warhol —
“Ohhh...… Read More
Peter Selz —
Curator / Museum of Modern Art, New York —
“It (‘Luminous Earth Grid’) emanates a sense of the romantic sublime with its aura of surprise and wonder. It is a very, very beautiful thing. I think people are very lucky to have a chance to see such a fine work of art.”

Andy Warhol —
“Ohhh..... those are beautiful!”
(from an interview, in response to Williams’ “Five Orange Spheres” project)

Allen Temko —
Pulitzer Prize-winning critic, San Francisco Chronicle —
“It (Luminous Earth Grid) is the most ambitious work of environmental art in the San Francisco Bay Area since Christo's Running Fence. It is a joyful thing.”

Panorama Mese Magazine, Milan —
“A skillfully orchestrated union of the literal with the metaphorical… a triumph of the ephemeral.”

iGNANT, Berlin —
“...Our emotional connection to an increasingly technologically dominated life would not be addressed by most artists until years later. This makes the Luminous Earth Grid, by American artist Stuart Williams, all the more remarkable...” Read Less
Since the 1980s, Stuart Williams’ monumental site-specific artworks have rolled over sweeping expanses of ranch land in California, and have floated on the moats of picturesque chateaux in France. From the Alps to Central Park, and from Los Angeles to Seattle, his head-turning, mesmerizing works have captivated t… Read More
Since the 1980s, Stuart Williams’ monumental site-specific artworks have rolled over sweeping expanses of ranch land in California, and have floated on the moats of picturesque chateaux in France. From the Alps to Central Park, and from Los Angeles to Seattle, his head-turning, mesmerizing works have captivated thousands.

His most ambitious installation, “Luminous Earth Grid,” was realized within view of a major freeway in the rolling hills north of San Francisco. “It’s like a computer generated image come to life,” said the artist, who spent five years raising nearly $500,000 to realize the massive project. Cosponsored by the New York Foundation for the Arts, and Intersection for the Arts in San Francisco, it was a vast array of 1,680 four foot, energy-efficient fluorescent lamps, which swept over an expanse equal to 8 football fields. Said Williams, “The glowing green grid can be seen as an icon of computer imaging technology, which in this ‘real life’ incarnation, gently melds with the flowing shape of a lovely landscape... a dream-like vision of symbiotic unity.”

The project drew international critical acclaim. Peter Selz, former curator at MoMA in New York and founding father of the UC / Berkeley Art Museum, said “It emanates a sense of the romantic sublime with its aura of surprise and wonder. It is a very, very beautiful thing. I think people are very lucky to have a chance to see such a fine work of art.”

Williams holds a degree in architecture from the University of Michigan. Soon after graduation, his interests gravitated decidedly to fine art, and more definitively to site-specific, environmental art. The site artists of the 60s caught Williams’ attention — as did the work of Turrell and Flavin — and so did the luminous colors of Diebenkorn, Rothko and Matisse. His education, with its blend of architecture, art, engineering and urban planning, provided him with an intimate understanding of historical context, scale, and three dimensional space. It also gave him a firm grasp on the importance of relating to the unique aspects of a specific site and locale. All of these factors helped to propel him into the realm of large-scale environmental art, with a focus on both urban and rural locations.

Currently, and under the sponsorship of the New York Foundation for the Arts, Williams is working on a dual-city light installation for Paris and New York, which will link the two cities in a shared public art experience.

Another installation, also being sponsored by the New York Foundation for the Arts, is now in planning for the City of Dresden, Germany. 2015 will mark the 70th anniversary of the firebombing of Dresden. In homage to Dresden’s survival and partial renewal, and to honor this important anniversary of an iconic moment in world history, American artist, Stuart Williams, will install “Lebensatem / Dresden” at the historic Dresden Cathedral in 2015. Williams will transform the facade with light... making the Cathedral appear to “breathe.” Waves of light, rising and falling at the pace of human breath, will create the visual impression of respiration. The Dresden Cathedral was completed in 1738, and is one of Dresden’s foremost historic landmarks. Along with the heart of Dresden, t was destroyed in WWII, and meticulously rebuilt — stone by stone — in the 1980s. With its prominent setting on the River Elbe, it is a key component of Dresden’s historic “silhouette,” and with its soaring Baroque tower reflecting in the river, a light installation here becomes an artwork on the scale of the cityscape.

“Given Dresden’s nearly total destruction in February 1945, I think the vision of one of its greatest historic landmarks appearing to breathe will be extremely moving. As an artist, I see the project as a way of honoring the survival and renewal of one of Europe's most beautiful cities. In the end, it becomes an affirmation of life itself.” — Stuart Williams

The artist has been the recipient of grants from a wide variety of organizations, among them, the U.S. Embassy in Berlin; The City of Dresden, Germany; Pacific Gas & Electric, San Francisco; The LEF Foundation, St. Helena, CA; The Rene and Veronica di Rosa Foundation, Napa, CA; and the Osram Sylvania Corporation. Williams has been an invited lecturer at numerous venues including the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, the San Francisco Art Institute, and the University of California, Davis. He lives and works in New York City. Read Less
Member Since: Jan 10, 2011