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Bēhance

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The real and the fictional world can be considered as the complex
relationship between the material and spiritual world,
the temptations of the body and the spiritual duties of the soul.

These two extremes are strongly interrelated in human life
and should not be seen as opposite poles or separate worlds.
...

Th… Read More
The real and the fictional world can be considered as the complex
relationship between the material and spiritual world,
the temptations of the body and the spiritual duties of the soul.

These two extremes are strongly interrelated in human life
and should not be seen as opposite poles or separate worlds.
...

This is a remarkable photo.
The ultimate silence of the touching of the water.
More than in any other photo
time is frozen.
The Japanese have this remakable little word 'ma'
to express the suspension of time.
It leads me further on to ponder on the size of the lake,
and allows me to think of the lake as being round,
circular and encompassing all.
Like in the evocative pictures of Van der Heijden.
The mirrorlike surface draws my attention to the title.
A self-portrait?
How is Paul included in this picture?
Who is this mysterious I?

Alberti.nl (May 2007)


Behind the facination any mirror, object or human, is able to provide, rests the (perception=)reality
that what you see is never 100% what you expect, what you get, what others get.
The reflection hardly equals perception; the reflection presents at least one outstanding feature that catches your eye and requires acceptance, if not comprehension--for starters--, comprehension
(=need to understand) being a more powerful driver than acceptance under human terms and ways, unfortunately.

Basically, it is unclear, to most of us, whether a (perception of) self is untrue or a (perception of) reflection. That is what really catches the eye. The drive to identify
the real self, as if there would be only one (perception of) way of the self.
Human nature at work, once again.

This photo, for example, could be just a snapshot, even if sold/ positioned as
a self-portrait of a the artist. Yet it is my view that decides
what this (perception of a) photo is, or this (perception of a) mirrored image is.
That makes the question irrelevant if the boy is caught in the act or directed.

The boy is just a happy boy, in (again, a Buddha state ;),
unaware of his larger than life nanosecond.
The reflection, though, is there, fully there, embracing
existence, not just hitting the water. The reflection shows the joy
and hope we all hold in some corner, and the catch is...
that we are both the boy and the reflection, simultaneously. Nothing fancier.
Or, if a tiny bit fancier, that we have the potential to be either, mirrored or not.
The choice. For all those majority instances when we're not mirrored. When we think
we're just one. When we refuse to think we're so many more,
and we're only comfortable with some of them getting mirrored ;)

I must add that the photo is a self-portrait of Paul... I've a weakness for Dutch guys... Perception rules. (Mirona Iliescu)
...


Paul Donker Duyvis creates a Japanese atmosphere in his work,
not only by using typically Japanese objects such as kimonos,
fans and rice or Oriental-looking women. These are obviously
Japanese, or rather Oriental, attributes, but still just
properties of his work.These Japanese characteristics merge
strongly with the ambiguity of his images.

The Japanese have an unspoken agreement not to regard
paradoxical matters as paradoxical.
Contradictory elements are presented on a common level
instead, camouflaging them with a certain vague ambiguity.
To Westerners, ambiguity is opposite to clarity, but the
Japanese perceive this vague ambiguity as a means of
understanding the many layers of possible meanings.
These characteristics can also be recognised in his work,
strengthening the sense of Japanese aura.

Yuri Fujimoto
...
Behind the facination any mirror, object or human, is able to provide, rests the (perception=)reality
that what you see is never 100% what you expect, what you get, what others get.
The reflection hardly equals perception; the reflection presents at least one outstanding feature that catches your eye and requires acceptance, if not comprehension--for starters--, comprehension
(=need to understand) being a more powerful driver than acceptance under human terms and ways, unfortunately.

Basically, it is unclear, to most of us, whether a (perception of) self is untrue or a (perception of) reflection. That is what really catches the eye. The drive to identify
the real self, as if there would be only one (perception of) way of the self.
Human nature at work, once again.

This photo, for example, could be just a snapshot, even if sold/ positioned as
a self-portrait of a the artist. Yet it is my view that decides
what this (perception of a) photo is, or this (perception of a) mirrored image is.
That makes the question irrelevant if the boy is caught in the act or directed.

The boy is just a happy boy, in (again, a Buddha state ;),
unaware of his larger than life nanosecond.
The reflection, though, is there, fully there, embracing
existence, not just hitting the water. The reflection shows the joy
and hope we all hold in some corner, and the catch is...
that we are both the boy and the reflection, simultaneously. Nothing fancier.
Or, if a tiny bit fancier, that we have the potential to be either, mirrored or not.
The choice. For all those majority instances when we're not mirrored. When we think
we're just one. When we refuse to think we're so many more,
and we're only comfortable with some of them getting mirrored ;)

I must add that the photo is a self-portrait of Paul... I've a weakness for Dutch guys... Perception rules. (Mirona Iliescu)
... Read Less
http://www.facebook.com/pauldonkerduyvis
http://sites.google.com/site/pddstudio/
Member Since: Aug 27, 2011