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Bēhance

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BIOGRAPHY
Born in 1970 in Montréal, I grew up in a peaceful suburb in Repentigny. At age 17, when it’s time to register at the CÉGEP, I hesitate between a career in social work and visual arts. With my mother’s encouragement – she enrolled me in oil painting classes – I undertake studies in fine arts and graphic d… Read More
BIOGRAPHY
Born in 1970 in Montréal, I grew up in a peaceful suburb in Repentigny. At age 17, when it’s time to register at the CÉGEP, I hesitate between a career in social work and visual arts. With my mother’s encouragement – she enrolled me in oil painting classes – I undertake studies in fine arts and graphic design. In 1992, I move to Montréal to work as a graphic artist. For 15 years, I evolve in advertising and a children’s book publishing firm (Éditions Tormont). Tired of the dehumanization of the graphic designer’s work and its growing computerization, I decide on a career change. In 2002, I begin studying psychology and graduate with a B.A. at the UQAM and since 2006, I’ve been working as a psychosocial mental health intervener. Having left graphic arts, but still passionate about visual and fine arts, I intensify my work as an artist and painter. This enables me to connect with the raw material needed to create. I’ve exhibited in different parts of Québec (solos, groups, symposiums). Galerie 2000 (Montréal), represented me from 2005–2007, until I decide to withdraw my work. As a result, I’ve become more independent enabling me to choose my exhibitions. Read Less
Although my paintings mostly represent landscapes, the final result of the subject itself matters little to me. The trees, clouds, rocks, mountains and water are the elements that provide me with a freedom that’s important for my creative expressions. In contrast, by attempting to represent characters or complex i… Read More
Although my paintings mostly represent landscapes, the final result of the subject itself matters little to me. The trees, clouds, rocks, mountains and water are the elements that provide me with a freedom that’s important for my creative expressions. In contrast, by attempting to represent characters or complex industrial objects, trees are not as stereotyped in the mental representation and therefore require less recognition. The Gestalt psychology has proven that man has a tendency to search for similarities with his own mental representation of an object. For example, it will strain one’s eye if an individual is not fairly represented. He or she will say that this individual’s ears are too large, or that he’s deformed and ugly! However, the shapes required to compose a landscape are simple: a cloud is a horizontal oval, a tree is a circle containing foliage, and a tree trunk is represented with a narrow vertical rectangle. Ultimately, the proportions also lose their complexity: a small and a large tree can be in proximity to a same plan because mother nature allows it do so. And so I’m free to explore different kinds of shapes, while allowing each piece to have its own rhythm. This also applies to the colours that obey this rule, dictated by seasonal daylight, a tree may be violet in the morning, grey if it’s lost in the depth of the landscape, or even orange when fall is coming. Then, if I feel like painting a purple tree, I acclimatise the sky so as not to confuse the observer. I use very little shading in order to bring about a playground filled with fun and spontaneity for my plastic work. Harmony is the most important rule I tend to respect in my work – I’m convinced harmony brings about a sense of well-being. When I paint, I always have in mind a sense of grace that I want to convey to people along with a desire to communicate simplicity, gentleness and happiness. My naive style reflects a child’s innocence; it isn’t obstructed by adults who would require it to be more sophisticated and well-learned. If my work manages in wanting you to forget the constraints of realism, bringing you to travel with complete recklessness with its shapes and colours, and without you even having had the time to ask any questions, then my mission will have been accomplished. Landscape painting provides me with this plastic freedom allowing me to playfully explore form and colour and thus convey a message of peace. Among the artists who inspire me, I would say – Gauguin, for the purity of his work, Marc-Aurèle Fortin for his love of trees, Lawren Harris for his skill with form and depth and Frédéric Back, for his sense of play. Read Less
Member Since: Sep 23, 2012