Showcase & Discover Creative Work Sign Up For Free
Hiring Talent? Post a Job

Bēhance

JShare
Project Views
Appreciations
495
Followers
92
Following
27
"...one can tell how much Jasmine Rossi loves her subject. Her stunning photographs ... are much more than pretty pictures. Rossi's (work) shows that successful photographers need both passion and persistence".

Russell Hart, Editor in Chief American Photo Magazine

Jasmine Rossi was born in Lausanne, Switzerlan… Read More
"...one can tell how much Jasmine Rossi loves her subject. Her stunning photographs ... are much more than pretty pictures. Rossi's (work) shows that successful photographers need both passion and persistence".

Russell Hart, Editor in Chief American Photo Magazine

Jasmine Rossi was born in Lausanne, Switzerland, to an Italian father and a German mother. She grew up in Spain, Germany and Italy.

Since 1999 she resides in Buenos Aires, Argentina - close to her favourite “canvas” the gigantic ice-fields of southern Patagonia, a region on which she has produced three photo-books.

Rossi’s Patagonia series covers a decade of work in a place so remote that it is known as “the uttermost part of the earth”.

The images were projected at the Smithsonian Institute in Washington, The National Arts Club in New York, and The Museum of Latin American Art in Buenos Aires.

A series of solo-exhibitions of her photographs followed in Argentina between 2000 and 2014. In 2013 they were shown for the first time in Switzerland.

Rossi’s images show the world, as it must have been over a span of millions of years, a world in which humans do not belong.

A primeval world of glaciers, deserts, fossils, and thousand-year-old trees. Rossi’s studio is nature in its rawest form.

Her subjects are created by wind, water and time and Rossi must embark on long expeditions to find them, be it in Greenland, in the Atacama Desert, or in Antarctica…

Her work requires sacrificing every comfort and exposing herself to nature and its elements for long periods of time.

Timing is of essence in Rossi’s work, her glacial sculptures in particular, are so ephemeral, that they are melting away before her very eyes...

In order to transmit the three-dimensionality and grandeur of these “sculptures of nature”, Rossi uses large scale backlit frames that act like a window on a world that is slowly disappearing forever… Read Less
Member Since: May 12, 2011