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Bēhance

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(Verona, Italy 1964) / Artist, Photographer, Writer, Architect
  • artist, photograph
    gianluca balocco — Verona, Italy
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Even though western culture is pervaded by millions of images, I believe photography (still very young) hasn't yet exhausted its expressive and cultural potential. Photography, like thought, has a neutral dimension and as such manifests itself only when it meets reality. This medium, like our eyes, is nourished by… Read More
Even though western culture is pervaded by millions of images, I believe photography (still very young) hasn't yet exhausted its expressive and cultural potential. Photography, like thought, has a neutral dimension and as such manifests itself only when it meets reality. This medium, like our eyes, is nourished by images and aligns itself perfectly with the mental and neuronic functionings of the human mind. Photography is first and foremost an autonomous language in which images, like words, become the third abstract dimension of a real spatial and temporal field. Photography is not a translatable language (it can only be described or interpreted) and it can only be partially considered a "universal language". I believe that photography finds its own artistic dimension in the moment in which it fulfils its own abstract codes. In the field of thought defined by image/space/time, our mind is regularly nourished by images and produces its own at such a rate that a very fine line divides experience from imagination and emotion. I would like to add a final consideration about photography: it is an irreplaceable language in the evolution of humankind, a means of understanding both ourselves and the world. In these last few years of research, I've become interested in psychology and sociology. I've always been attracted to everything dealing with the mind, thought, the subconcious, philosophy. I am convinced that it is in these areas of study that art can practise its collective mission. Read Less
In the early 1980's I studied photographic techniques and based my artistic research around this medium. In those years I considered photography as a simple means to attain a painterly result. The "photo traces", for example, are photographic images transformed into pictorial and material compositions that derive … Read More
In the early 1980's I studied photographic techniques and based my artistic research around this medium. In those years I considered photography as a simple means to attain a painterly result. The "photo traces", for example, are photographic images transformed into pictorial and material compositions that derive from a still frame of cinematographic film. Photography became, in this research, a quick and cold way to replicate the eye and the mind in the moment in which they capture a spatial and temporal moment. In these works the photographic image is not printed with a traditional process of developing on paper, but is created with a cast in plaster from a plastic and metal mould. In these works, photography becomes a simple material trace made of plaster, wool, and paper. In the 1990's my personal research in photography and video opened a new and important chapter exploring the mind of individuals: photographing the mind as a container of the collective memory. Our thoughts derive from images and translate into emotive and mnemonic states common to all. Fixed images of groups of people create a link between the external photographic vision and the internal mental image of each person who makes up a group. Travelling without a Passport is inspired by Bionian theories about the relationship between memory and emotions. In 1993 I presented the results of my work in the XLV Biennale di Venezia as a photography and video installation. The work evolved from a three-month study of a group of 20 long-term female patients in a psychiatric hospital. A few years later I created a similar work with a group of poets who I met through the Modern Art Museum of Marseille. Some of my most important exhibits of the 1990's were in the following museums and galleries: The Contemporary Art Museum of Umbertide, "Mystery and Myth" in the Fukuyama Museum of Art, Chiba Prefectural Museum of Art, and The Museum of Art - Kockhi, Ilda City Museum, "Five Rooms between Art and Depression (A.Bonito Oliva) at Museo Correr Venezia. In 1995, in collaboration with a group of psychoanalists, I began researching photographic images as mental objects of a "collective thought". In 1996, I studied the theories of Wilfred Bion e di Gerald Edelmann, and participated in several national conferences of psychoanalists. In 1997 I was invited to create an installation at the Lingotto di Torino for the 100th anniversary of the birth of Bion. In the 1990s I directed the following short films: The Tube (1994), Poets don't cast shadows (1995), Brain Beat (1995), Rapid Eye Movements (1996), Twenty Five Thousand Days (1996), and October (1997). Read Less
Member Since: Sep 10, 2012