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Bēhance

Tipping Point (Egypt)

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  • “I have been bullied and threatened but I will not be intimidated by them.I will fight the 
    Muslim Brotherhood until each and everyone of them are put in jail.”

     
    Those were the words of Mervat, one of a number of women who have empowered themselves to speak out and take action amidst the political and economical turmoil facing Egypt. She frequents Tahrir square, leading protests and rallies and putting her own safety at risk. 

    Following the Egyptian Revolution of 2011 and the resignation of President Hosni Mubarak, executive power was assumed by the Supreme Council of the Armed Forces, which dissolved the parliament, and suspended the constitution.

    In 2012, presidential elections resulted in the election of Mohammed Morsi as Egypt's fifth President. Since then, the economy has worsened, tourism declined, unemployment is soaring and women’s freedom and rights are at risk. This series show the many faces that are leading the charge to push for the change that many Egyptians have been longing for.
  • A cloth human figure hangs on a telephone pole, symbolising public execution.
  • A banner directed at President Morsi reads "The people impeached and overthrew the President." (referring to former President Mubarak)
  • Protestors at Tahrir square look on as President Mohamed Morsi addresses the nation on the eve of the voting for the second referendum. A poster of Egyptian political hero Gamal Abdel Nasser, who led the Egyptian Revolution of 1952 hangs on the left.
  • A memorial in Tahrir Square made by the demonstrators in honour of those who died during the protests
  • A scuffle breaks out at Tahrir square amid protests.
  • People walking across one of the barriers set up by the military near Tahrir Square to separate troops from protesters.
  • Child holding a metal pole at one of the barriers erected by the military police.
  • A man holds up his baby among the photos of many protestors who have lost their lives since the start of the revolution.
  • Visitors at the Tahrir square memorial.
  • "I am an Egyptian citizen. I have a problem and I am not a political activist. I cannot find the bread Morsi, you have to go. Our hope in God that the Judiciary system will help us and our chests are open for your live ammunition, damn you Tantawy. Beware Morsi that what overthrew Mubarak was the bread."
  • A man holds up signs making sarcastic statements about the rule of the Muslim Brotherhood, saying that he is not ruled by those people and that their statements do not represent him.
  • A woman yells anti-Morsi chants, while other protestors and onlookers follow her lead.
  • Guard on patrol around the perimeter of the Presidential Palace. Demonstrations have moved from Tahrir square to the palace gates as different groups of protestors arrive with different demands for change ever since Morsi's inauguration day.
  • Pedestrians walk by barbed wire fencing near the shops adjacent to the Presidential Palace.
  • Business located in the proximity of the Presidential Palace has suffered badly due to the frequent protests and military presence. One of the streets near this store for example has been blocked off with barbed wire fences.
  • Trucks filled with military personnel remain on standy-by at the Presidential Palace in Heliopolis.
  • Protestors and revolutionists gather around Tahrir square every night.
  • Women of the revolution. Left Banner: "No for the 'assassination' of the judges" Right Banner: "Disgracing the Judiciary system is disgraces all Egyptians"
  • People playing football on the grounds of Tahrir square.
  • Anti-Morsi protestor at Tahrir square.
  • Protestor with Egyptian flag facepaint at Tahrir square.
  • Man playing a guitar. Protest tents setup in center of Tahrir square can be seen in the background. Several hundred people have spent many weeks and months camping out in the square, demanding change from the army generals now in power in Egypt.
  • Sit-in protestors living in make-shift tents keep warm around a camp fire at Tahrir square. They vow to continue their protests until their demands are met by President Morsi.