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Bēhance

  • A day in the life, or just a single moment in time...
    This is a series of images focusing on people and their work, emphasizing physical labor.
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    For more works please visit my website and Facebook page.
  • Everyone in my city knows Israel, the "Corn Man", who has been standing on the same street corner for decades, selling the tastiest sweet corn around. The aroma rising from the pot spreads in the air, convincing kids and grownups alike to buy a snack. And you always get a gum or a lollypop as a bonus too.
    A few weeks ago, I was passing by that street again, and there he was - standing at his usual place with the sweet aroma in the air, while people kept on stopping to buy his trademark corn. Although he told me he didn't like to have his picture taken, he gave in eventually and let me take his portrait. When I was just about to go, he opened the huge, steaming pot, took out a cob faster than I could refuse, put just the right amount of salt on top and handed it to me with a smile. It truly is the best sweet corn I've ever had.
  • Ya'akov has been a carpenter for over 45 years. He has a small shop a on a street I often pass by.
    The shop is very unique. Ya'akov holds a cigarette as he works, while loud, avant-garde Jazz music plays in the background. The shop is full of vintage furniture, as this is Ya'akov's field of expertise, to restore and renew old items.
  • Abraham is a cobbler, but has also been a security guard for over three decades.
  • "Bangles" - (Taken in Israel).

    Last September, Hindu care-workers for the elderly celebrated Ganesh Chaturthi by dressing traditionally and dancing to Indian music in a small park.
    It was quite an unusual scene, not something one sees here often. The elderly people all sat around and watched the young dance. The women were beautifully dressed for the occasion, in colorful saris and bangles, and apart from dancing were constantly posing for pictures they took of each other. Needless to say I took my share of shots as well.
  • Mazal told me she has been cleaning buildings for over four decades. She's about 70 years old but still has to work hard each day.
  • This man, a vegetable vendor at the market, was peeling a big pile of garlic when I noticed him. At first I wanted to take a portrait, but chose to focus on his hands instead. I found touching and beautiful the way he gently yet proudly held the garlic. The fruit of his labor.
  • Zvi is a glazier running a family business that - in his own words - ends with his generation. The craftsman works in a building that is about 115 years old (one of the first in the city) and belonged to his family for generations.
  • Makune works hard from the early morning hours, sweeping the pathways at the university campus. He was very surprised when I first approached him, as most people pass by without a single glance in his direction. Couldn't ask him very much because he knows very little Hebrew and no English, but he agreed to pose for a picture, one that shows him and his work.
  • This is Anna, a tailor who works at the local dry-cleaning shop.
  • Portrait of a local fruit vendor.
  • Portrait of a Cobbler

    I met Alex by pure chance, while taking a turn on a small, unnoticed street. He sat with his wife in his tiny "office" and welcomed me with a smile. Alex is a Holocaust survivor. A diploma hangs on his wall dedicated to him for his bravery and courage, but he doesn't like to talk about it. I'm just glad that I took that turn and took his portrait.