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ERIC REID

I am a student at Ryerson University studying Architectural Science with work experience in the Architectural field, from working on permit drawings in an office to on-site coordination, which led to hands-on construction and management experience.

My interest in graphic design led me to start my own c… Read More
ERIC REID

I am a student at Ryerson University studying Architectural Science with work experience in the Architectural field, from working on permit drawings in an office to on-site coordination, which led to hands-on construction and management experience.

My interest in graphic design led me to start my own company called
ESR Design Co. (ESR-dc)
| SERVICES
Branding: Logos, Letterheads, Business Cards, Business Proposals, Signage
Design-Permit: Residential Homes, Additions, Renovations, Interactive Installations, Lighting Design Read Less
  • Site Supervisor
    Urban Core Developments — Hamilton, Ontario, Canada
  • Student Associate
    Svedas Architects — Canada
  • Backshop Supervisor
    Hamilton Golf and Country Club — Ancaster, Ontario, Canada
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INTERACTIVE ARCHITECTURE

Architecture was referred to as “Frozen Music” by Johann Wolfgang von Goethe in 1829.1 This quote makes it evident that the experience of art and the architectural have long been intertwined. Recent technological advancements in materials, fabrication techniques and interactive art … Read More
INTERACTIVE ARCHITECTURE

Architecture was referred to as “Frozen Music” by Johann Wolfgang von Goethe in 1829.1 This quote makes it evident that the experience of art and the architectural have long been intertwined. Recent technological advancements in materials, fabrication techniques and interactive art yields interesting installations, yet our buildings remain static, unresponsive masses. Why not convert one of Philip Beesleyʼs interactive sculptures into a tangible form of architecture? Beesleyʼs projects force us to consider the role of rapidly advancing technology on our architecture, not only as material choices but as a conceptual muse to push the boundaries of construction and design.2 This begs the question, currently what is the commonality that drives all architecture? Based on Thomas Kuhnʼs principles, we are currently in a Cybernetic culture that interacts in many new, previously impossible ways as a result of the computer. This public embrace of technology has provided a second trend Kuhn defines as Sustainable Design.3 Technological advancements allow learning to be done anywhere and at any time which provided a platform to educate the masses about sustainability. As well, private companies, such as LEED, encourage sustainable design practices, specifically geared toward architects to think more sustainably. In the past decade, it has become more evident that technology and sustainability are a commonality among designers around the world, which might spark the beginning of a paradigm shift. The change will likely be realized in the new ways buildings are designed and constructed, and a main goal for any project may be to achieve net zero efficiency as a common practice. This begs a new question, can buildings be constructed as net zero anywhere in the world? If so, is it affordable, suitable to any climate and can it be constructed using only local materials?

Contemporary architecture has become more dynamic in form and material in the recent decades. As these boundaries are pushed, a common style among todaysʼ architects becomes hazy, unlike past periods such as the Renaissance and the Baroque, where a clear rationale and style are evident. During these periods in history, the importance of storytelling was a vital part of their art and culture. Contemporary designs are often realized through technical means, such as computers and fabrication. These manifestations are dynamic in appearance but static in construction and use; and often lack the narration that previous generations of architecture possess. Contemporary architects consider someone in a building, an occupant. It is the hope that with exponential advancements in technology, the passive occupant will become an active user that interacts with the architecture around them. In turn, it will become easier for architects to once again narrate their intent through material and spatial responsiveness in order to provide a suitable environment for the user. Architecture in the near future should respond and react to varying conditions on the interior and exterior. It should increase the convenience and comfort of the occupant through highly customized user controlled environments. As well as, react to changing environmental considerations, such as rain, wind and sunlight; in order to maximize efficiency and provide the character of the architecture. Buildings like this will be able to react and possibly change form, altering the look and experience of the building from hour to hour or from one season to the next. Architecture will become less of a static piece of art or sculpture, but a plastic medium using technology as a muse that could redefine the industry and foster the creation of fluid, rhythmic music in the form of interactive architecture.

1 http://en.wikiquote.org/wiki/Johann_Wolfgang_von_Goethe
2 http://www.philipbeesleyarchitect.com/
3 Jstor - Kuhn on Architectural Style Read Less
GAZING & GLAZING

The root word of gazing is gaze, meaning to “look steadily and intently, especially in admiration, surprise, or thought.”1 As humans our primary sense is sight, because it is vital to navigating and understanding our surroundings. Our sight allows us to visualize the world and our experiences,… Read More
GAZING & GLAZING

The root word of gazing is gaze, meaning to “look steadily and intently, especially in admiration, surprise, or thought.”1 As humans our primary sense is sight, because it is vital to navigating and understanding our surroundings. Our sight allows us to visualize the world and our experiences, which allowed us to envision better environments to live in. Vision has allowed us to not only perceive, but understand our role as humans and as builders. As our ancestors became less nomadic, homes and shelters were built, yet only an open door or cave entrance would allow for views out of the shelter. As architecture evolved, openings were created to allow for more light to enter into larger and larger structures, as well as provide views of the surrounding environment. In contemporary architecture, windows have become more than just openings in walls they have become walls themselves.

The word glazing is defined as, “panes or sheets of glass set or made to be set in frames, as in windows, doors, or mirrors.”2 Glazing in architectural terms, is typically glass, used to span an opening of an exterior wall. Currently, glass is one of the most rapidly advancing materials because of the integration of technology, which allows for more control over interior environments, exterior expression and the quality of views or sight lines provided. The advances are more evident in modern architecture because of the exaggeration of straight lines and views. Products like Smart Glass fuse new technology with glass in order to control the opacity by the flip of a switch, literally. The architectural use of glazing became an important tool in visually connecting the surrounding environment with the interior environment. Many contemporary interpretations of Frank Lloyd Wright try and embrace his beliefs and use glass as a physical, not a visual barrier.

The relationship between the two words can be explained as, gazing or viewing is the driving consideration for architects when designing an opening or frame for the glazing. What is the window pointed towards? Do I want them to look at this? Do I want people to look in? How does it deal with light? Many architects choose to frame specific views of the surrounding, while others do not use glazing as visual elements but experiential. For example, in many of Tadao Ando’s projects he exaggerates thin slices of light passing through glazing by contrasting it by dark shadows cast by the solid concrete. His design considerations for glazing were to evoke a mood or atmosphere in the space. The same can be done by defining the purpose or intent behind the opening; to gaze or look intently, the glazing becomes more than a physical barrier, it becomes a form of architectural expression. In contemporary architecture, glazing has become common place, often without enough consideration of the intent and affect it may have on the interior and exterior environments. The trope analyzed highlights the consideration of a person’s experience as the driving force behind the glazing strategy, without it, glazing is simply the glass within a window frame, not a form of architectural expression.

1 http://www.thefreedictionary.com/gazing
2 http://www.thefreedictionary.com/Glazing+in+architecture Read Less
Member Since: Oct 11, 2011