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Have you ever walked into a room when someone is pealing an orange and detected the familiar orange aroma wafting throught the air? What you are smelling is the natural essential oil that is housed within the rind of the orange. It is the rinds of citrus fruits that gives them their highly aromatic and familiar ar… Read More
Have you ever walked into a room when someone is pealing an orange and detected the familiar orange aroma wafting throught the air? What you are smelling is the natural essential oil that is housed within the rind of the orange. It is the rinds of citrus fruits that gives them their highly aromatic and familiar aroma. Although the majority of commercially available essential oils are extracted from the original botanical material by use of steam distillation, most citrus essential oils are extracted by pressing the rinds of the citrus fruits. The next time that you eat an orange or a grapefruit, take a portion of the peel and squeeze it in half ensuring that the colorful side of the peel is on the outside. If the fruit is fresh and healthy, you should notice that the rind squirts a tiny quantity of an aromatic fluid. That fluid is the essential oil. Read Less
ESSENTIAL OIL LISTING

Essential oil of Eucalyptus
A glass vial containing sandalwood oilDavana Essential OilEssential oils are volatile and liquid aroma compounds from natural sources, usually plants. Essential oils are not oils in a strict sense, but often share with oils a poor solubility in water. Essential oi… Read More
ESSENTIAL OIL LISTING

Essential oil of Eucalyptus
A glass vial containing sandalwood oilDavana Essential OilEssential oils are volatile and liquid aroma compounds from natural sources, usually plants. Essential oils are not oils in a strict sense, but often share with oils a poor solubility in water. Essential oils often have an odor and are therefore used in food flavoring and perfumery. Essential oils are usually prepared by fragrance extraction techniques such as distillation (including steam distillation), cold pressing, or extraction (maceration). Essential oils are distinguished from aroma oils (essential oils and aroma compounds in an oily solvent), infusionsin a vegetable oil, absolutes, and concretes. Typically, essential oils are highly complex mixtures of often hundreds of individual aroma compounds.

Agar oil or oodh, distilled from Agarwood (Aquilaria malaccensis). Highly prized for its fragrance.
Ajwain oil, distilled from the leaves of Bishop’s weed (Carum copticum). Oil contains 35-65% thymol.[2]
Angelica root oil, distilled from the Angelica archangelica.[3]
Anise oil, from the Pimpinella anisum, rich odor of licorice, used medicinally.[4]
Asafoetida, used medicinally and to flavor food.
Balsam oil, from the Myroxylon pereirae.[5]
Basil oil is used in making perfumes, as well as in aromatherapy
Bay oil is used in perfumery; Aromatherapeutic for sprains, colds, flu, insomnia, rheumatism.
Bergamot oil, used in aromatherapy and in perfumes.
Black Pepper essential oil is distilled from the berries of Piper nigrum. The warm, soothing effect makes it ideal for treating muscle aches, pains and strains.
Buchu oil, made from the buchu shrub. Considered toxic and no longer widely used.[citation needed] Formerly used medicinally.
Birch is aromatheapeutic for gout, Rheumatism, Eczema, Ulcers.
Camphor is used for cold, cough, fever, rheumatism, and arthritis
Cannabis flower essential oil, used as a flavoring in foods, primarily candy and beverages. Also used as a scent in perfumes, cosmetics, soaps, and candles.[6]
Caraway oil, used a flavoring in foods. Also used in mouthwashes, toothpastes, etc. as a flavoring agent.[7]
Cardamom seed oil, used in aromatherapy and other medicinal applications. Extracted from seeds of subspecies of Zingiberaceae(ginger). Also used as a fragrance in soaps, perfumes, etc.[8]
Carrot seed oil (essential oil), used in aromatherapy.
Cedarwood oil, primarily used in perfumes and fragrances.[9]
Chamomile oil, There are many varieties of chamomile but only two are used in aromatherapy- Roman and German. Both have similar healing properties but German chamomile contains a higher level of azulin (an anti-inflammatory agent).
Calamus Root, used medicinally
Cinnamon oil, used for flavoring and medicinally.
Cistus species
Citronella oil, from a plant related to lemon grass is used as an insect repellent, as well as medicinally.
Clary Sage
Clove leaf oil, used as a topical anesthetic to relieve dental pain.
Coffee, used to flavor food.
Coriander
Costmary oil (bible leaf oil), from the Tanacetum balsamita[10][11]
Costus Root, used medicinally
Cranberry seed oil, equally high in omega-3 omega-6 fatty acids, primarily used in the cosmetic industry.
Cubeb, used medicinally and to flavor foods.
Cumin oil/Black seed oil, used as a flavor, particularly in meat products. Also used in veterinary medicine.
Cypress
Cypriol
Curry leaf, used medicinally and to flavor food.
Davana oil, from the Artemisia pallens, used as a perfume ingredient and as a germicide.[12]
Dill oil, chemically almost identical to caraway seed oil. High carvone content.
Elecampane, used medicinally.
Eucalyptus oil, historically used as a germicide. Commonly used in cough medicine, among other medicinal uses.[13]
Fennel seed oil, used medicinally, particularly for treating colic in infants.
Fenugreek oil, used medicinally and for cosmetics from ancient times.
Fir
Frankincense oil, used for aromatherapy and in perfumes.
Galangal, used medicinally and to flavor food.
Galbanum
Geranium oil, used medicinally, particularly in aromatherapy, used for hormonal imbalance, for this reason geranium is often considered to be "female" oil.
Ginger oil, used medicinally in many cultures.
Goldenrod
Grapefruit oil, extracted from the peel of the fruit. Used in aromatherapy. Contains 90% limonene.[14]
Henna oil, used medicinally.[15]
Helichrysum
Horseradish oil
Hyssop
Idaho Tansy
Jasmine oil, used for its flowery fragrance.
Juniper berry oil, used as a flavor. Also used medicinally, including traditional medicine.
Laurus nobilis
Lavender oil, used primarily as a fragrance. Also used medicinally.[16]
Ledum
Lemon oil, similar in fragrance to the fruit. Unlike other essential oils, lemon oil is usually cold pressed. Used medicinally, as an antiseptic, and in cosmetics.[17]
Lemongrass. Lemongrass is a highy fragrant grass from India. In India, it is used to help treat fevers and infections. The oil is very useful for insect repellent.
Lime, anti septic, anti viral, astringent, aperitif, bactericidal, disinfectant, febrifuge, haemostatic, restorative and tonic.[18]
Litsea cubeba oil, lemon-like scent, often used in perfumes and aromatherapy.
Mandarin
Marjoram
Melaleuca See Tea tree oil
Melissa oil (Lemon balm), sweet smelling oil used primarily medicinally, particularly in aromatherapy.
Mentha arvensis oil/Mint oil, used in flavoring toothpastes, mouthwashes and pharmaceuticals, as well as in aromatherapy and other medicinal applications.[19]
Mountain Savory
Mugwort oil, used in ancient times for medicinal and magical purposes. Currently considered to be a neurotoxin.[20]
Mustard oil (essential oil), containing a high percentage of allyl isothiocyanate or other isothiocyanates, depending on the species of mustard
Myrrh oil, warm, slightly musty smell. Used medicinally.
Myrtle
Neem oil or Neem Tree Oil
Neroli is produced from the blossom of the bitter orange tree.
Nutmeg
Orange oil, like lemon oil, cold pressed rather than distilled. Consists of 90% d-Limonene. Used as a fragrance, in cleaning products and in flavoring foods.[21]
Oregano oil, contains thymol and carvacrol, making it a useful fungicide. Also used to treat digestive problems.[22]
Orris oil is extracted from the roots of the Florentine iris (Iris florentina) and used as a flavouring agent, in perfume, and medicinally.[23]
Palo Santo
Parsley oil, used in soaps, detergents, colognes, cosmetics and perfumes, especially men’s fragrances.[24]
Patchouli oil, very common ingredient in perfumes.
Perilla essential oil, extracted from the leaves of the perilla plant. Contains about 50-60% perillaldehyde.
Pennyroyal oil, highly toxic. It is abortifacient and can even in small quantities cause acute liver and lung damage.[25]
Peppermint oil, used in a wide variety of medicinal applications.
Petitgrain
Pine oil, used as a disinfectant, and in aromatherapy.
Ravensara
Red Cedar
Roman Chamomile
Rose oil, distilled from rose petals, Used primarily as a fragrance.
Rosehip oil, distilled from the seeds of the Rosa rubiginosa or Rosa mosqueta. Used medicinally.
Rosemary oil, distilled from the flowers of Rosmarinus officinalis. Used in aromatherapy, topically to sooth muscles, and medicinal for its antibacterial and antifungal properties.[26]
Rosewood oil, used primarily for skin care applications. Also used medicinally.
Sage oil, used medicinally.
The spice star anise is distilled to makestar anise oil
Sandalwood oil, used primarily as a fragrance, for its pleasant, woody fragrance.[27]
Sassafras oil, from sassafras root bark. Used in aromatherapy, soap-making, perfumes, and the like. Formerly used as a spice, and as the primary flavoring of root beer, inter alia.
Savory oil, from Satureja species. Used in aromatherapy, cosmetic and soap-making applications.
Schisandra oil, from Schisandra chinensis, used medicinally.
Spearmint oil, often used in flavoring mouthwash and chewing gum, among other applications.
Spikenard, used medicinally.
Spruce has calming and elevating properties. It can be used as a topical application for muscular aches and pains, poor circulation, and rheumatism. Spruce Oil has also been used to improve breathing conditions of asthma, bronchitis, coughs, and general weakness.[2]
Star anise oil, highly fragrant oil using in cooking. Also used in perfumery and soaps, has been used in toothpastes, mouthwashes, and skin creams.[28] 90% of the world's star anise crop is used in the manufacture of Tamiflu, a drug used to treat influenza, and is hoped to be useful for avian flu
Tangerine
Tarragon oil, distilled from Artemisia dracunculus, used medicinally.
Tea tree oil, distilled from Melaleuca alternifolia, used medicinally. Being a powerful antiseptic, antibacterial, and antiviral agent, tea tree's ability to fight infection is second to none.
Thyme oil, used medicinally.
Tsuga belongs to the pine tree family. It is used as analgesic, antirheumatic, blood cleanser, and stimulant. It treats cough, respiratory conditions, kidney ailments, urinary infections. [3]
Turmeric, used medicinally and to flavor food
Valerian is used for insomnia, migraines, nervous dyspepsia, and dandruff.
Vetiver oil (khus oil) a thick, amber oil, primarily from India. Used as a fixative in perfumery, and in aromatherapy
Western red cedar
Wintergreen can be used as an analgesic, anodyne, anti rheumatic & anti arthritic, anti spasmodic, anti septic, aromatic, astringent, carminative, diuretic, emenagogue and stimulant [4]
Yarrow oil is used medicinally, to relieve joint pain
Ylang-ylang is used for calming, antiseptic, and aphrodisiac purposes, as well as hypertension and skin diseases. [5]
Zedoary, used medicinally and to flavor food


Essential Oils for Christmas:
Warming/Spicy/Resinous/Woody/Spiritual Essential Oils and Absolutes Allspice
Anise
Anise, Star
Basil, Holy
Balsam, Peru
Bay
Bay Laurel
Benzoin
Black Pepper
Cardamom
Cassia
Cedarwood, Atlas
Cedarwood, Virginian
Chocolate Peppermint
Cinnamon
Clove Bud
Coffee

Common Sage
Cypress
Dalmation Sage
Dill
Fennel
Fir Needle
Frankincense
Galbanum
Ginger
Gurjum Balsam
Immortelle
Juniper Berry
Marjoram
Myrrh
Nutmeg
Oakmoss
Olibanum
Peppermint
Peppermint, Chocolate
Pine, Scotch
Sage, Common
Sage, Dalmation
Sage, Spanish
Sandalwood
Scotch Pine
Spearmint
Spikenard
Spruce
Star Anise
Sweet Orange
Thyme
Vanilla
Vetiver Blending Spice and Mint Oils
Essential Oils for Autumn (Fall):
Warming/Spicy/Resinous/Woody Essential Oils and Absolutes Allspice
Anise
Anise, Star
Balsam, Peru
Bay
Bay Laurel
Beeswax
Benzoin
Black Pepper
Cardamom
Carrot Seed
Cassia
Cedarwood, Atlas
Cedarwood, Virginian
Cinnamon
Clove Bud
Coffee
Common Sage
Coriander
Cumin
Dalmation Sage
Dill
Fennel
Frankincense
Galbanum
Ginger
Gurjum Balsam
Immortelle
Myrrh
Nutmeg
Oakmoss
Patchouli
Rosemary
Rosewood
Sage, Clary
Sage, Common
Sage, Dalmation
Sage, Spanish
Sandalwood
Vanilla
Vetiver Blending Spice Oils



Seasonal Essential Oils for Spring:
Floral/Energizing/Herbaceous/Sweet Essential Oils and Absolutes Atlas Cedarwood
Basil
Bay Laurel
Beeswax
Bergamot
Bergamot Mint
Blue Cypress
Bois-de-rose
Boronia
Cardamom
Carrot Seed
Catnip / Catmint
Chocolate Peppermint
Citronella
Clary Sage
Cypress
Dill
Eucalyptus Globulus
Eucalyptus Radiata
Geranium

German Chamomile
Grapefruit
Hyssop
Jasmine
Juniper Berry
Kanuka
Lavender
Lavendin
Lemon
Lemon Balm
Lemon Eucalyptus
Lemongrass
Lemon Myrtle
Lemon Tea Tree
Lime
Linden Blossom
Mandarin
Manuka
Marjoram
May Chang

Melissa
Neroli
Orange
Palmarosa
Parsley
Peppermint
Petitgrain
Roman Chamomile
Rose
Rosewood
Spearmint
Tagetes
Tangerine
Tea Tree
Tuberose
Violet Leaf
Virginian Cedarwood
Ylang Ylang
Yuzu Read Less
General Safety Information: Do not take any essential oils internally without consultation from a qualified aromatherapy practitioner. Do not apply undiluted essential oils, absolutes, CO2s or other concentrated essences onto the skin. If you are pregnant, epileptic, have liver damage, have cancer, or have any oth… Read More
General Safety Information: Do not take any essential oils internally without consultation from a qualified aromatherapy practitioner. Do not apply undiluted essential oils, absolutes, CO2s or other concentrated essences onto the skin. If you are pregnant, epileptic, have liver damage, have cancer, or have any other medical problem, use essential oils only under the proper guidance of a qualified aromatherapy practitioner. Use extreme caution when using oils with children and give children only the gentlest oils at extremely low doses. It is safest to consult a qualified aromatherapy practitioner before using essential oils with children. A skin patch test should be conducted prior to using an essential oil that you've never used before. Instructions on conducting a skin patch test and more safety information can be found by visiting the Essential Oil Safety Information page. For very in-depth information on essential oil safety issues, read Essential Oil Safety by Robert Tisserand and Tony Balacs. Read Less
Member Since: Dec 5, 2012