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Christy Lee Rogers is a visual artist from Kailua, Hawaii. Her obsession with water as a medium for breaking the conventions of contemporary photography has led to her work being compared to Baroque painting masters like Caravaggio. Boisterous in color and complexity, Rogers applies her cunning technique to a barr… Read More
Christy Lee Rogers is a visual artist from Kailua, Hawaii. Her obsession with water as a medium for breaking the conventions of contemporary photography has led to her work being compared to Baroque painting masters like Caravaggio. Boisterous in color and complexity, Rogers applies her cunning technique to a barrage of bodies submerged in water during the night, and creates her effects naturally in-camera using the refraction of light. Through a fragile process of experimentation, she builds elaborate scenes of coalesced colors and entangled bodies that exalt the human character as one of vigor and warmth, while also capturing the beauty and vulnerability of the tragic experience that is the human condition.

Rogers’ works have been exhibited throughout the US and Europe and are held in private and public collections throughout the world. She has been featured in International Magazines, including Harper’s Bazaar Art China, Eyemazing, The Independent, Casa Vogue, Photo Technique and others. Rogers’ "Reckless Unbound" is currently housed at Longleat House in the UK; the stately home, which is the seat of the Marquesses of Bath and is also home to Renaissance gems of the Italian masters, like Titan’s "Rest on the Flight into Egypt."

Duncan Beebe, Eyemazing Magazine
“Her work is undeniably contemporary yet also timeless; portions appear to be drawn from the Baroque period, where dynamic movement and overt emotion were at their height. Many have likened her work to the Baroque master Caravaggio, with her emotive dynamism and dramatic use of lighting. Using pronounced chiaroscuro, where light and dark violently contrast, the light in her images appears to alternately engulf the female form or to be on the verge of dwindling to nothing, leaving them alone in the abyss of boundless space. Light isolates her figures, but her use of spotlighting differs from Caravaggio in that it is atmospheric and benevolent; it insulates the figures from the space surrounding them, that empty space which allows light to strike her subjects, not just as transparent dissolvable images of people, but as solid, real, and seemingly impenetrable beings."

"Her figures represent something internal and widely experienced. She successfully and intelligently depicts the wordless doubts and dreams that all of humanity is heir to. Beneath the wondrous exterior, at their core, these strange figures are more human than human; their souls are bared and radiant to one and all.” Read Less
Member Since: Oct 7, 2011